First of all, I only recommend science-based, humane training. The process of training should not involve using fear, pain or physical violence. Training is more than simply obedience, or having your dog sit, lie down or come when you call him. Training encompasses much more than that; it involves bringing a dog into your home and making sure that he receives consistent messages and understands the rules of the house, and he receives from you what he needs for his well-being. You cannot expect a dog to behave if everyone in the family has different expectations and rules. You cannot expect a dog to behave if he is not socialized properly and is afraid of all of the children in the neighborhood or barks out of the window all day at passing dogs and people. You cannot expect him to behave if he is mentally or physically under-stimulated. A bored or under-exercised dog can be anxious, destructive, bark or even become aggressive. Training involves making sure that he is able to live in your world comfortably, without undue stress.

Your relationship should not feel like a battle between you and your dog, but a partnership. He should "behave", not because he is afraid of getting physically harmed (which I DO NOT reommend), but because he is motivated to do so. Motivation is not an easy concept. People know they should be on time to family functions, but what "motivates" them to do so? What motivates a person to drive the speed limit? Fear of getting a ticket or an accident? It is very easy to jerk a dog by the leash if they pull on the walk, but do you know how to teach and motivate your dog not to pull using gentle, humane methods? This is much more complex and takes more skill. The benefits are much greater when you train a dog humanely. Not sure how to do it? I can show you. 

I use three main concepts for training. Shaping, prompting and luring.  

Shaping involves rewarding behaviors that you want your dog to repeat, and ignoring undesired behaviors. An example of this is holding a treat over your dog's head while ignoring his jumping and giving him the treat when he stops jumping, sits, or engages in any other behavior that you decide is more appropriate. 

Prompting involves using a physical movement to initiate your dog's response. Examples of this include tapping your leg or gently pulling on your dog's leash after you say, "come". 

Luring involves using a treat to move your dog into position. The most widely used example involves moving a treat over your dog's head so he follows the treat and sits as a result. 

There is a great deal of training theory that goes into proper training techniques. I will synthesize the concepts for you into easy to understand rules and strategies that you will be able to practice in between sessions. One of my favorite expressions is, "it is not difficult if you know how to do it". This definitely applies to dog training. I will help streamline your dog training so you practice the techniques correctly and you use your time efficiently and effectively. 

I will treat both you and your dog nicely and will not make you feel bad. I have heard numerous clients over the years say that their dog "flunked" puppy class. That is a bad way to motivate the human student to train their dog! If you have trouble with any of the training, I will show you how to do it, and then watch you do it yourself so you feel confident doing it on your own. If training is not fun for you, you will not practice. I want you to be successful and so it is my job to make the training easy and fun for both you and your dog! Proper training actually feels like you are playing with your dog. You are both having fun and your dog is learning. What could be better than that?

I look forward to meeting you, and working with you and your family I can show you lots of tips, strategies, games and exercises for training to end up with a happy dog and a happy household.